Bio

Heart is the essence of this talented Alaska native’s charming music. His songs are a deep and satisfying exhale, as if Tollefson sings primarily to rid his ribcage of the sorrow, satisfaction and rich stories that simmer within it. His sound breathes the doleful spirit of the blues yet pulses with savvy pop sensibility, whether he’s transmitting it via a muscular electric groove or a gorgeous, gently plucked acoustic guitar.

After touring last year with Donavon Frankenreiter and Rayland Baxter, the Seattle resident started working with Justin Armstrong (Dave Matthews, Death Cab, Peter Frampton) on an album slated for release in fall of 2014. He's cherry picked a ground shaking team of musicians from Seattle and venues in the northwest are taking notice. The result is a fresh show with a wide range of dynamics. They not only capture a room, but also give them the very thing that a lot of shows miss with their audience. Groove. 


The Polar Ends:

 

Surrounded by the thunderous rhythm section of Jay Foote and Brian Jones, guitarist Sam Kearney and producer/engineer Rob Evans, Eric created an eight-track album where pure rock 'n' roll sits comfortably alongside lovelorn laments, and where mournful strings, swooping guitars, ethereal background vocals and purposeful tape hiss all make perfect sense. 

 

The record’s songs are a deep and satisfying exhale, as if Tollefson sings primarily to rid his ribcage of the sorrow, satisfaction and rich stories that simmer within it. His sound breathes the doleful spirit of the blues yet pulses with savvy pop sensibility, whether he’s transmitting it via a muscular electric groove or a gorgeous, gently plucked acoustic guitar.

 

Because Tollefson tends to traverse a plethora of musical styles, it was an appropriate decision to engage two producers: the aforementioned Evans, who helmed the album’s rockers, such as “Whose Love” and “Vultures,” and the Franchot Tone, who produced “Heart on a String” and “Before You Go,” a staggeringly beautiful heartbreaker pulling in master pedal steel player Eric Heywood, (Son Volt and Ray LaMontagne, among others). The song also stands as The Polar Ends first focus track, sporting a nifty video, which has just premiered. 

 

Taken as a whole, The Polar Ends is more than the next album from a confident young singer-songwriter. It feels like a vibrant introduction to a vital new recording artist. 

 
Good Cop PR, Perry Serpa
perry@goodcoppr.com